The rise of orange wine, the white made like a red

IT’S the new drop that’s tantalising tastebuds yet confusing even the wine snobs. Popping up in bars, it’s definitely not a red wine and it doesn’t look like a white. With its pastel hue you might think it’s related to a rose. Think again. And while it’s called orange wine, its name has nothing to do with the wine growing region of Orange. But it could conceivably come from there.

Reblogged 1 year ago from www.winebiz.com.au

QLD wines: Looking to the Mediterranean for success

Queensland wines are lagging behind the rest of the country, or so it seems. Of the more than 2500 vineyards in Australia, there are only 100 in the state. But while Queensland may have the least vineyards out of all the states, the ones we do have are real performers. Uncorked and Cultivated Master of wine, Peter Scudamore-Smith, said you have to look outside of the traditional varieties to see the real performers in Queensland.

Reblogged 1 year ago from www.winebiz.com.au

Langton’s Classification: Australia’s fine wine ‘form guide’

Australia’s Langton’s Classification may not be as well-known as Bordeaux’s 1855 Classification, but it is an excellent barometer of how the Australian fine wine market is developing. In a similar way to St-Emilion’s classification, Langton’s is reviewed every five years and wines can be added, deleted, promoted or demoted. Started in 1990, it’s a three-tier system: Exceptional, Outstanding and Excellent.

Reblogged 1 year ago from www.winebiz.com.au

Keeping wine as a family affair harder as big business moves in

Bill Hardy, the fifth generation family member of Australian winemaker Hardys, talks proudly of his pioneering great-great-grandfather Thomas Hardy and his vision to create fine wines sold in the markets of the world. Over at Grant Burge, the winemaker’s website tells of fifth-generation Barossa vigneron Grant Burge who along with his wife Helen founded Grant Burge Wines in 1988, driven by the passion of the Burge family.

Reblogged 1 year ago from www.winebiz.com.au

Aussie doctors want cask wine to be ‘taxed out of existence’

DOCTORS have called for cheap casks of wine, or “goon bags” — the staple of underage drinking in the park — to be taxed out of existence. The Royal College of Australian Physicians wants wine to be taxed like beer, to stop the health budget being wasted on preventable, alcohol-­related ailments. “This is not about stopping people drinking wine, this is about taxing cheap alcohol, which is abused by young people and those who already have problems,” RACP President Professor Nick Talley said.

Reblogged 1 year ago from www.winebiz.com.au