Thirteenth Annual Pinot Noir Shootout

To all of my wine pals, I don’t know anyone who works more tirelessly for Pinot Noir than Barbara Drady does. Her Affairs of the Vine annual shootouts are worth your time and energy. I believe in the process of a collective palate, just as I do for individual ones. Barbara’s panels are always worth […]

The post Thirteenth Annual Pinot Noir Shootout appeared first on Wine Blog.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.wine-blog.org

More Riesling from the ground up

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: Following a Winestate award for Australia’s best Riesling last year, Port Augusta’s Boston Bay Wines has cleared one seventh of its vineyard to double Riesling output in two years. The former chardonnay vines, which were originally planted as Riesling in 1984, will return to their former glory. Boston Bay Wines’ Tony Ford said his father grafted the vines in to chardonnay vines but they retained the original Riesling roots. He said they were sawn off at the base and would regrow as full size riesling vines in two years.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.winebiz.com.au

Ghost Rock to create its first sparkling with the help of Jansz winemaker Natalie Fryar

Natalie Fryar completed school work experience with Hardys winery at age 13. At 15 she started making wine. Now, the former Jansz winemaker will work with the North-West’s largest winery Ghost Rock as it makes its first sparkling. “My real passion is Tasmanian sparkling wine. This is not just the best region is Australia, but it’s one of the best in the world,” she said. “The most exciting thing about the Tassie wine industry is that most of it isn’t planted yet.” As well as consulting for Ghost Rock, she will work on her own sparkling vintage.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.winebiz.com.au

FUN FRIDAY: This robot can improve wine production

It seems that robots are becoming more important in our daily lives, doing everything from reminding us of our appointments to vacuuming our carpets. Now, though, robots are helping us in another way: by assisting vineyard owners manage their wine production tasks. This robot, aptly called the VineRobot, comes with a set of sensors that allows it to measure important qualities in grapevines, such as vine development, water levels, production and composition of the grapes themselves. After collecting its data, it wirelessly sends it to the vineyard owner for further analysis.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.winebiz.com.au